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Lao modern literature since 1975

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After 1975 established authors such as Outhine Bounyavong, Dara Viravongs, Pakian Viravongs, Douangdeuane Viravongs and Seree Nilamay resumed their literary activities alongside revolutionary writers such as Phoumi Vongvichit, Souvanthone Bouphanouvong, Chanthy Deuansavanh, Khamlieng Phonsena and Theap Vongpakay. They have since been joined by a younger generation of writers.

Lao literature Under the Royal Lao Government era

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Throughout the Royal Lao Government era, scholars such as Pierre Somchine Nginn and Maha Sila Viravongs continued to transcribe important works of traditional Lao literature which had not previously been available to the general public; many of these were subsequently published under the auspices of the Lao Literary Committee (fore-runner of the Lao Royal Academy, established in 1951) and the newly-established Vientiane General Library (later the National Library).

Lao literature during the French colonial period

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Printing arrived late in Laos; the first Lao publications appeared in the 1920s, but print quality remained relatively poor for decades after this, and during the latter years of the colonial period most French-language government publications were still printed in Vietnam, while Lao-language material was sent to neighbouring Siam.

Lao literature during the Lane Xang era

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The earliest recorded history of the Lao dates from the period immediately following the establishment of the kingdom of Lane Xang in the late 14th century, but the development of an indigenous Lao literary tradition is usually attributed to the reigns of three illustrious kings of the 16th century - Wisunarath (1500-1520), Photisarath (1520-1550) and Sai Setthathirat I (1550-1571).

Early Lao Literature

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As in neighbouring countries, the earliest literature to emerge in what is now the Lao PDR served to perpetuate the various proverbs, myths, legends and cosmology associated with particular ethnic groups. Today several of Laos' ethnic minority groups still preserve a rich tradition of epic stories, performed by village elders who are charged with keeping the ancient art alive.

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